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Setting a Good Example Online

Years ago when I first came on line.  You heard more about computer users being yelled at, trolled, ignored, cussed out, and very much abused on forum and group boards for not asking a question in the right manner.  I have notice that trend on many boards, and groups has been changing.  There is not as much so called "old school" as there use to be. In the beginning of the year of 2000. You learned which boards you had to post to a certain way, and you did not dare stray from their way of posting.  Or else, they would cut you up, and have you for dinner.  Then throw your left overs out for the rest of the pack to have a go at it.  They were a ruthless bunch.  Called "old school".  It was OK to ask a question.  "But I am watching you.  You better post it right or else!"  For some.  It was like a game, or time of passage.  As soon as someone posted wrong.  Out came old school to tear them a new hole.   Some forums, boards, and groups were ruthless.  Many people did not dare post to these type boards.  They chose instead just to read the post, and move on to the next board.  Then in 2001, a change started to take hold. Overnight new boards, forums, and groups emerged.   With a new set of rules.  As long as you did a search first, and put as much info in as possible in your post when you asked a question, or that you knew,  they would help you.  Yes a few were still ruthless.  But many on these new boards started to tell old school to back off.  They realized old school was running off potential customers.  So some complained, and after much consideration, they changed.  I decided my group at Yahoo, was going to be one of these new boards.  We were one of the first that did not care about how a question was asked.  I did not want any one yelled at, or abused in that matter.  Granted it was hard at times.  Because I had old school and new school on my group.  But we prevailed.  We won the hearts over.  We Showed everyone by setting a good example.  We did not stop there either.  The next example we set for our users to follow was the fact that on our group the user was expected to keep their computer secure as much as they could.   For many, they were not even doing this.  They may have a firewall, but many had no anti-virus software.  Some had neither.  We set up guidelines for the users to follow, thus a rule was born, and they pretty much followed our lead to keep their computer secure at all times.  Yes we have had a few failures.  But for the most part our computer users tackled computer security with as much robust that they could muster.  We were also the first to do this, as far as I know were were.  When many of the computer groups on Yahoo were spreading viruses, our group was humming along as though it was just another day.  Yes a few managed to pick up a virus or a worm here or there.  But what ever was hitting Yahoo Groups at the time did not grind our group to a halt. It never has. We follow these same rules today.  Have no need to change them.   Honestly I don't see how a computer group can function without setting up some basic security guidelines for the members to follow.   If everyone did this, I believe the Internet would be a better place.  Tell them they have to do their part to help keep the Internet secure, by keeping their computer secure.  Make it a rule. After all...  The Internet has both businesses, and consumers on it together. From all walks of life.  Not just consumers. Not just businesses.  The time has come too demand secure computers.  Would you please make this a common rule on your group, forum, or board? Please set a good example.

1. Invalid Page Fault.This occurs when the operating system (Windows) fails to actuallyaccess information (data) that was requested by one of yourprograms. solve? Close the offending application that caused the error.2. Fatal Exception Error.This happens when a program or the system itself tries to workwith sickly data, such as a corrupt file. Files get corrupted ifall the ducks aren't lined up just so. Everything has to beabsolutely precise, or wham! Fatal Exception. Nobody was hurt,were they? I hope not!Remedy: Close the offending application. Sometimes it's Windows.3. General Protection Fault (GPF).Your computer has to have enough resources to support everythinggoing on inside. If it runs low, or resources leak into space,you may see a GPF. This may also happen if two applications tryto use the same memory location, like two cars attempting thesame parking place.Remedy: Again close the offending application.4. Runtime Error.These occur while applications are running. The only way to curethem is to restart the application.

I always get the same question when it comes to security.  "How do I secure my computer to keep it from getting infected all the time?" Your security may not be failing.  It could be the person handling the keyboard and mouse.  Some see the warnings, and just ignore them.  Others see the warnings, don't understand them, and install/view anyway.  Plus some others see the warnings, and could care less about them, because it is not their computer.  Many people are also overwhelmed because they have several computers in the home scattered from one end of the home to the other.  So it makes it hard for them to keep track of how the computer is doing if they can't keep track of the location.  Mainly this would be laptops/notebooks.  In other homes it is the number of people using just one laptop/notebook or desktop, and keeping track of them to make sure they are not defeating the security settings/software.  Oh and we must not forget the computers that are never updated through windows update, never scanned, and the security software is never updated. I guess they like the pretty icons sitting in their task bar or something?  Or maybe the lack of the icons sitting in the task bar?  Because a few have even disabled their security software. Years ago a lady contacted me by email saying that her neighbors boy came over about once a week, and always when he left her computer was infected.  She asked me "what is a person to do?"  I said, "Plain and simple, he doesn't use your computer anymore."  She emailed me back stating... "I don't want to be rude."  I emailed her back and asked,  "And he is not being rude to you?"  I got a thank you back from her a month later.  She said it was the first month she had gone through without her computer being infected in the last eight months.  In the eight months this lady was not rude.  She did more cleaning of her computer, than she did actually using it.  She was more worried about being rude, than trying to protect her investment.   She had a great security setup, but the neighbors boy ignored her security even after she explained to him her rules. What was she thinking? Another email I got was from a guy.  He said his son was the problem every security he put in place this kid broke.  He even caught the boy on the computer at like 2:30am in the morning.  He wanted to stop him.  When I found out it was a laptop.  I could not help but to laugh to myself.  I emailed him back and told him to put the computer in his bedroom, under the bed, or in the closet so his son would not have access to it.  Then ground the boy from using the computer for a while.  Clean the computer if it needs cleaned, update everything make sure the security software is always running, and if he brakes the rules about the security settings again then take the computer from him, and tell him he is not using it if he can't follow the rules.  The older the child, the longer the no access to computer. A few days later I got a email back thanking me.  He said it just didn't dawn on him to parent the child.  The boy was sixteen, and he just did not think to do this. Another household both parents emailed me to inform me that they had a problem just keeping track, and keeping the computers clean.  I can't imagine what this household was like.  All I can tell you is their house was a revolving door.  Teens from everywhere.  Mainly because their four children were in sports.  So they had all of their desktops in a central location.  But anyone could use them.  All of the computers had XP and Vista.  They asked for suggestions.   My suggestions were for all of the computers to have passwords on the teen accounts, and parents accounts.  The guest account would be locked down.  They could not download anything etc.  They would have the most limits on this account on each of the computers.  No one (their teens or themselves) could give out the passwords to their own accounts to anyone.  The only password that was given out was to the limited account.  Just in case someone was able to guess or find out their account passwords, it would be a good idea to change the passwords every 60 days on the teen accounts and every 30 days on the parents accounts.  Someone from the home would be at or around the desktops when in use by someone outside the home.  All accounts used a different desktop background too.  You just about have to have this rule when there are so many using the computer.  if need be, change the passwords more often.   It puts a strain on the household. But it is necessary.   This is just in case one of the visitors knows how to go around your security.  So if that account's security does end up being breached, you can check the time and date of the breech, and have a general idea of who did it. It's not fool proof.  But most don't know how to change all of, or how to breech the settings on the computer.  So naturally you can find out.   As for the different desktop backgrounds for each account... This is done so you will know which account they are logged into.  You need only to glance at the screen to know.  This family took this one step further though.  They put a picture on the guest account that was only available to the guest account, and not to the others.  They were able to give privacy to the guest, and be assured they were logged into the right account.  This same account used a certain theme as well.  They could see from across the room, or at the door which account they were logged into.   They had emailed me later on and said they only had trouble with one guest because of this set up.  They did not tell me what the problem was.  They just said they had to stop this one guest from using their computers.  Other than that.  It has worked for them having this setup.  Their computers are more secure than they ever have been.  But it also put a strain on the family.  Because they only used their account, and no one else's...  They had to become more aware of what they themselves were doing on their account.  There was restrictions as to what they could download, because of size of the download, and where the download was located on line.  They followed my rules for downloading WOT and siteadvisor as well.  This made them more aware of the potential danger on line.  A lot of it they did not realize was on the websites they visited.  But they were thankful for the setup because it has saved them several times.  They were already avid users of security software like firewalls, and anti-virus programs. But they changed out their anti-virus software because it was not doing a good job.  They were now happy. Which brings me to another example of another user that emailed me stating that her anti-virus software was just not catching the bad stuff.  Her computer was infected at least once every month or two months.  It is not important to tell you the name of the anti-virus software she was using, but just to inform you that you are not stuck with a anti-virus software if it is not working, then change to something else.  Many things can cause this.  It could be the what you have installed on your computer.  What browser you use.  What firewall you use.  Or the lack of steady updates from the anti-virus software vendor.  What ever the case you are not stuck to always use that anti-virus software.  Change to something else.  You can choose free, or pay.  But be sure that you give the software a free run before you buy first.  That includes firewalls.  If your computer slows down, crashes, or is not able to catch the bad stuff then move on to another security software.  Keep in mind also that certain security software does not play nice with other security software on certain Operating Systems all the time.  Sometimes security software will have glitches, that will just about ruin a computers performance, or ruin the security on your computer.   So if you have a new security software keep a eye out for glitches, rather if they are small or large.  There very well could be something going on in the back ground that you are not aware of.   Your computer should run better, or the same, not worse after installing security software.  Run a test to see how the software is performing too. Firewall test:  https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2 and anti-virus test: http://www.virusportal.com/com/downloads/down_run.shtml  This lady thought she had to use the software that was installed on her computer when she bought it.  This simply is not true.  The choice is yours, not the security vendor, nor the vendor you purchased your computer from.  The choice is always yours to change to a different vendor for ALL of your software that you need, or want.

Solving their problems was easy, some of them had a hard time accepting the truth.  Others, well let's just say they had a duh moment.   

We now broadcast on Blogtv.  Blogtv is a place where friends and like minded individuals can get together and watch a live show.  I am the broadcaster.  Come watch me broadcast at Blogtv, and listen in live to my southern charm accent as I broadcast on a number of different topics.  We always have a emphasis in having fun.  You must be sixteen to enter. Topics include: All technology news including security. When available and if important, or may be of interest to the viewers. cool download found online -  Interesting finds fun sites  (clean humor, nothing R rated) crazy stuff I found on the Internet (clean, nothing R rated) every now and then a freebie software, or maybe even a hardware, etc. a few tutorials slapped in entertainment I found around the Internet. Don't forget the music! This service includes Free chat!  Chat with me as I broadcast.  If you become a member of blogtv then (subscribe/friend)  which is also free, then you may have the opportunity to co-host with me. As we venture in this new technology later on we may even have a few interesting guest for you to chat with.  Come join the excitement! Schedule: Saturday 9:00pm eastern This time may change in order to accommodate as many guest as possible.  Stay tuned! Link  http://www.blogtv.com/People/weebit weebit

According to Symantec, malware's million mark was reached in the latter portion of 2007(1).  In 2006 Microsoft released a report stating that for fifteen months their malware removal tool scanned and found 16 million instances of malicious software on 5.7 million unique Windows-based computers.(2) For the month of March 2010 1,456,524 give or take a few computers were infected.(3) Keep in mind this is just one report from a on-access scanner. Which literally means the anti-virus software was downloaded and installed and run a scan  for the first time which found the malware. For some time now I have checked the stats on what the malware is up too.  How much malware is there? How many computers were infected? How many websites?   ...So how many websites were infected? Sophos detected an average of roughly 5,000 infected Web pages a day for 2007.(4)  Then in 2008 they detected an average of around 15,000 infected Web pages a day. 79 percent of those 15,000 are legitimate websites. In 2008 Symantec observed an average of 75,158 active bot-infected computers per day.(5) Today Trend Micro reports 26,669 computers were scanned this past 24 hours, and found to be infected after a scan done by HouseCall, on-line virus scanner for PC. In the past thirty days Trend Micro's on-line scanner  HouseCall scanned and found 16,488,049 infected computers.(6) That number is rising every second you read this article. Kaspersky noted In 2009, the system for analyzing vulnerabilities identified 404 different vulnerabilities, and a total of 461,828,538 vulnerable files and applications were detected on users’ computers. They analyzed the 20 most common vulnerabilities, which made up 90% (415,608,137) of all vulnerable files and applications identified on computers running their anti-virus software.(7) The number of computers infected with Conficker.A or Conficker.B dropping from a high of around 6.7 million in late October 2009 to around 6.3 million machines in January 2010. The number of Conficker.C infections has declined from 400,000 computers in late October 2009 to roughly 280,000 in January 2010.(8)(9)

The number of malware (malicious software) samples that Symantec saw in 2009 was 71% higher than in 2008. In total, Symantec identified almost 2.9 million items of malicious code during that 12 month period. (10) Amazing?  I just wanted you to see some numbers here so you could grasp somewhat of a count.  Keep in mind that I just gave you stats from just a few websites over a few years. It is no where near the total for all infected computers.  It does not give a accurate count on total on-line, and on-access scans for ALL computers active on the Internet today, and a few years past. Plus at any time the number of malware can change.  You are just seeing a small percentage of the amount of infected computers online. You need to see these numbers because, just having someone tell you to keep your computer secure is not enough.  Today's computer users are vast.  You are always a target.  Regardless if you are reading e-mail, or visiting a webpage you are at risk. This also is regardless if the e-mail or website you are visiting or reading has a good reputation or not. It does not matter. YOU are a target. YOU need to have a secure computer.  Security list links: http://newbies-pc.com/8896/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=91:security-links-a-must-have&catid=47:security Some of these links are pdf files (1)http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/print/9075518/Malware_count_blows_past_1M_mark (2)http://blog.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2006/06/microsoft_releases_malware_sta.html (3)http://www.securelist.com/en/analysis/204792106/Monthly_Malware_Statistics_March_2010 (4)http://www.toptechnews.com/story.xhtml?story_id=59415 (5)http://eval.symantec.com/mktginfo/enterprise/white_papers/b-whitepaper_internet_security_threat_report_xiv_04-2009.en-us.pdf (6)http://wtc.trendmicro.com/wtc/default.asp (7)http://www.securelist.com/en/analysis/204792101/Kaspersky_Security_Bulletin_2009_Statistics_2009 (8)http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9145018/Conficker_worm_hasn_t_gone_away_Akamai_says? (9)http://www.confickerworkinggroup.org/wiki/pmwiki.php/ANY/InfectionTracking (10)http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8630160.stm

What you are looking at right now is a new section added to our website.  This section could prove to be very interesting.  The section consists of three main categories.  (More will be added later) One category is for your home, next is your personal computer, and the last category is for your website. The categories ask the almighty question... Is there a APP that does this?   It just basically is asking if there is software somewhere in the Internet that can do the following?  Then you post what you need the software to do.  Then the comment section comes into play by posters either offering a software name that does what you described, or you may get lucky enough for a software programmer to be interested in your idea.  The more descriptive you are in the Can Apps? Section, the better chance of you getting a response.  

This is a overview of the Windows Operating Systems Security features.  Windows XP was not added to this because I wanted to concentrate on just the two newest Windows Operating Systems.  This is just a short review nothing elaborate.  Keep in mind I have access to a Vista computer, but no access to a Windows 7 computer.  My report comes from observations online, and from computer users themselves.    

Have you ever gone to a forum, or a help board, and among the many post you see a topic or subject that screams help in Caps?  Then when you get to the post, and begin to read you just want to slap em?  Why you ask?  Well, because their post reads as follows....

           HELP! My puter is not working right.  My (insert software here) is not working.  I don't know what is wrong with it.   

 

Ok so you look at the post, and you ask yourself um.... What version?  What Operating System?  What software were you running when this happened?  What was you trying to do with the software?  Um... What exactly happened?  I mean sheesh, we can't help you much if you don't give us some stats here.  We don't need to know where you was born, but we sure need to know a little bit about how you have your computer configured.  We can't guess.  We are happy, and human just like you are.  (you are human right?)

 

So next time you run into a problem on your computer, type out a brief explanation of what happened (not a novel).  What Operating System you use.  What version of the software you was using.  (Can be found on the tool menu at top under "help" > "about". )

 

If you have no clue what you have running on your computer.  Then visit the link we have on our pages to your left look under Resources, and look for Belarc Advisor. It's free!

A good majority of people will do a search, and click on the first couple links of the search results.  Other's may go through two or three pages of search results. Many are unaware that search results are unbiased when it comes to secure content.  They only need to contain the "right" search terms. This doesn't mean that you should avoid search engines.  But you should pretty much have a idea if the URL you are fixing to click is from a reputable website, or from a website out to do you, or your computer harm.   

 This is a extensive list of tips to help you protect your computer against viruses.  No method is 100% secure, but this should really help you cut back on them, or even have large breaks in-between infections.  I follow these rules my self, but most call me a pro, but I consider myself as self taught, and somewhat wise.  I have not had a virus in nine years.  (knock on wood)

 

 

 

 The following are Windows 7 reviews.  These reviews are just what has been observed

thus far in the Windows 7 Operating System.  It does not mean everything here will be included in the official release.   There is video, pictures, and plenty text.   Enjoy!

 

These are just a few tips for the members. :) Occasionally I do post just random tips.  They fit in no one type category.  Just browse through them, and pick out your favorites. 

 Everyone wants to know how to decide what software to get.  It is not a exact science.  Even a seasoned software pro can get burned, or end up with a software that does not work on their computer.  Thus I wrote up these tips a while back in order to help the newbies find the best software, and not get burned as often. 

 

While many of us are blessed with sight.  There are many others that are not so blessed.  As a child gets use to a sightless world.  They also will be getting use to the Internet as well. It is very important for you to start a child out slow, but steady getting around the internet.  There is software that does this.  These software are either geared towards Windows, or they are geared towards Mac, or Linux, or all three.  Don't let anyone tell you that you have no options.  A added note is if the individual regardless of age is now having to get use to a sightless world, please spend time with them also at the keyboard.  Some individuals tend to feel overwhelmed, and having a good support system helps them to become independent faster.  

Install and run Software on a External Drive

In order to save space if you have a small internal hard drive you may want to consider installing software on a external hard drive.  This does not always work, you will have to experiment.  The problems you may run into are that the software needs to be administrator in order to run. The software may have dll

problems, or it could lock up, or freeze.  Not all software needs a strict regiment of required rules when it is installed, and they run fine on the external drive.

The following APP was downloaded using Firefox, and installed on a Toshiba

external hard drive that was located on the F: drive.  Your location could be

named different.  Named by the manufacturer for the hard drive and

depending on if you have multiple drives.  Follow along as you learn with

this picture tutorial on how to install a software and run the software on

the External hard drive.  It is not as hard as you may think.

 

When you buy a computer it is no different than when you purchase a car, or any other big ticket item.  You always check the integrity of the car. How well the car does, gas mileage, style, seating, engine, etc.  You want the most bang for the buck you spend, and certain options are a must like power breaks and a/c. A computer is no different. With a computer you check the integrity of the parts, (hardware), software, and the Operating System, make sure you will be able to carry out the important aspects of the things that matter to you the most when you log on to your computer, etc. Plus make sure your computer is secure as possible.
There will come a time that you will install a Windows Update, and the update wont play nice with your computer.  If it starts to act up on day one of the install, then this is the time to remove it.  Some updates just get worse as you restart, or boot your system.  So act as soon as you spot trouble. 
You open a file, and you know you should be able to see it, the file is sitting on the taskbar, but when you click on it you can't see the file's window.  What do you do?  Well... You don't need to reinstall the Windows Operating System.  Do the following: Click the file in the taskbar.Press ALT + spacebar to summon the window's shortcut menu.Press M to choose the move command.Use the keyboards arrow keys to move the window.When you have it moved to the desired spot press the "enter" key on your keyboard.

For those not knowing .  Here is a eye view of one in action. Be sure to visit the link also.  They have quite a bit of good information on this topic. 

 Here is the video on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxytdLwDLqg  or visit the link below. 

A live Twitter phishing attack from Sophos Labs on Vimeo.

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